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Invited Speaker: Prof. Hamid Kokabi

Invited Speaker: Prof. Hamid Kokabi

Invited Speaker: Prof. Hamid Kokabi

Electromagnetic microsystem for POC immunoassays using magnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic structure

Hamid Kokabi received his Dipl. Ing. degree in electrical engineering from ENSICAEN in France in 1989, his MSc and PhD degrees in material sciences for electronics from Caen University in 1990 and 1993 respectively. After he spent one year (1993/1994) in Japan as a post-doc working on piezoelectric thin films for embedded strain sensors. He joined University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC currently Sorbonne University) in Paris as assistant (1994-96) and then associate professor (1996-2005) and obtained his “Habilitation to lead research” in 2003 and full professor position in 2005. He is member of the research laboratory “Group of electrical engineering of Paris (GeePs)”. His interests have been sensors and instrumentation and included passive electronic components and integrated piezoelectric sensors, microwave superconductivity, NDE using high Tc RF SQUIDs and other magnetic sensors for nonmagnetic metals. He has been highly involved in 2013 as a member of the founding committee in the creation of a new multidisciplinary health institute between engineering and medical faculties at Sorbonne University, dedicated to research and education on biomedical engineering. He has been from 2014 to 2016 responsible of the research council of this institute and in 2016 also of its international relations with an intensive biomedical exchange program he initiated and leaded with the University of Waterloo jn Canada. He has been in charge of the research theme on biomedical applications of electronics and electromagnetism since 2010 and currently in charge of the thematic “Electrical engineering for health” with more than 30 researchers involved at GeePs laboratory. He is currently involved in research projects on sensors and systems for medical and biological applications

https://sorbonne-fr.academia.edu/HamidKokabi

Electromagnetic microsystem for POC immunoassays using magnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic structure

Prof. Hamid Kokabi

 

The rapid detection and quantification of one or more biological agents has become essential to anticipate a possible public health threat (epidemic or pandemic), environmental or other contextual threats. In this area, one of the main objectives is to facilitate this detection with a portable, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive and reliable lab-on-chip system. To achieve this goal, it is therefore necessary to design and build microsystems composed of innovative sensors. The biological analysis based on high sensitivity magnetic measurements is a new type of immunological diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) as markers instead of the enzymes, radioisotopes or fluorochromes conventionally used. This new method of analysis involves the coupling of antibodies or antigen proteins to MNP. The specific binding of the antibody to its antigen is assessed by the detection of MNP of various sizes and also different magnetic properties through a planar micro-sensor that measures the induced magnetic field variation. The signals measured by the magnetic gradiometer are functions of the quantities of immune complexes (antibodies + analytes). The microfluidic channels integrated in this system make it possible to use very small quantities of reagents (microliters), thus reducing by several orders of magnitude the volume of samples to be used and therefore the cost of the test. The time required for bioanalysis will also be considerably reduced which can be very significant in the case of epidemics or pandemics, water, food and environmental security. This project is based on the complementary and multidisciplinary skills of different involved research teams collaborating to this project at Sorbonne University (GeePs, CIMI, LISE and PHENIX) and in Germany (Institute of Bioelectronics, FZJ Juelich) and Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, (IME, Aachen). The objective has been to carry out the design, the multiphysics modeling and simulations, the fabrication, the characterizations and the validation of a portable microsystem associated with microfluidic reservoirs for single pathogen and multipathogenic detection in biological fluids (saliva, urine, blood).